Thursday, May 30, 2013

Other Cases With Similar Elements


TOPIC POST
May 31, 2013

Although difficult to quantify, experts estimate that 2,300 people per day are reported missing in the U.S. The vast majority of these are not stereotypical stranger abductions and many are resolved quickly.  The following is a good discussion of the demographics of the missing by David Krajicek: tp://www.trutv.com/library/crime/criminal_mind/forensics/americas_missing/2.html

Other cases may spur insights.  If you know a lot about one, I would like to hear your thoughts.


Here are two cases I have looked at closely because they feature elements that could illuminate thinking about Maura's case.

Brooke Wilberger - Most who know of Maura's case know also of Brooke's. They both were abducted in 2004 and their cases were featured together in a 2008 ABC special, made before Brook's case was solved.

Brooke's case illustrates that a body can be effectively hidden in the back woods in cunning ways.  Officials close to the Wilberger case have said that but for the apprehension of her killer via other investigative tracks and his subsequent deal to avoid the death penalty, Brooke may never have been found. In terms of Maura, therefore, it raises consideration of whether - even with the rivers frozen and the ground too hard to dig in New Hampshire in February - a cunning serial killer might effectively have hidden her body.This short article and video provide background on that topic: http://www.kval.com/news/local/62585902.html?tab=video&c=y

Leah Roberts was a 23 year old young lady from Durham, North Carolina. Like Maura, she bolted in her car without telling anyone (we know of) where she was going or why.  Also like Maura, she had recently seen tough emotional times, including the death of both her parents.  Her jeep was found crashed down a highway embankment north of Seattle.  Other than a few reported sightings (including one reported in a mysterious, suddenly terminated call to authorities), she has never been seen again. Like Maura's case, there are intriguing details whose ultimate significance remain unknown.  This case perhaps has or will someday yield insights about Maura's perhaps confused or panicked state of mind after the accident.  This is good discussion of Leah's case: http://foothillsgazette.com/2010/03/25/10-years-later-missing-person-case-remains-open/

53 comments:

  1. You are again building up background material to support your "simply abducted" theory.
    I know it is easier and saves you lots of trouble to go for that solution. This theory also helps you and James to start writing (and cash in) the book you are working on as we'll as constituting a bridge between the writer and Maura's family ( getting their approval should be an important leverage when publishing the book I believe).
    Although the "simply abducted" theory is a probable solution to this case there are many more background details that needs to be looked into (and ruled out) before one can diagnose this case as a simple abduction.
    I believe many followers of this case will be greatly disappointed with you and James if you tie this into a abduction finale without solid evidence.

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    1. Adriana Pacheco -LesemannJune 3, 2013 at 12:59 PM

      MaxxHeadroom...Not one here, including Mr Renner or Mr Green is trying to gather support for, as you put it, a simple abduction. Abductions are never simple because that involves a crime of mayor proportions and many complicated elements. Please don't make accusations without truthful foundations. There is NO evidence of how and if a crime occurred with Maura and not one is categorically saying that. I think we are in a process of listening to others and drawing certain conclusions when possible. Not one here has bad intentions much less "making money" out of this tragedy. What you find here is a group of people that whether anyone likes it, or believes it, wants to find her.

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    2. I'm not writing a book and have no role in James' writing. I have no fiduciary or artistic interest in it. I am looking forward to reading it. Recently I was disappointed that James would not share information with him that would have saved me time thinking through an issue. His comment: that can't be talked about until the book comes out."

      No offense, but you therefore, are - without any ill intent I am sure - blowing a little smoke in terms of the premise of your comment.

      The reality is this: I'm some dude with a lot of good credentials and skills to analyze data and facts, perform ancillary research around issues, and turn it into factual information for reference for James and for discussion here (though not infallibly so as my recent whiff on "the call was to Julie" shows). James thus asked me post my insights to help. That led to me being more involved in trying to make sure that responses are posted here when people take time to post ideas, and to connecting up offered materials to other stuff James has or may be interested in. But the bottom line is that when he writes the book, I am as irrelevant as a snickers bar to his artistic and professional interests. In fact, most likely, I will never talk to the guy again whenever I stop making posts here.

      As for my mistaken wording, see my response to a below post. This one from a poster who simply asked about it rather than jumping to a big theory and false set of suggestions.

      If I could, I would like to ask you to consider this: please ask me first - even through an email - if I say something that does not sound right or that suggests an uneven perspective being applied to the case. Don't accuse first. That way we can keep positive discourse flowing. In this case, the only issue was a poor choice of words. Thanks in advance for thinking on this suggestion.

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    3. I appreciate you jumping up on that Adriana. I agree with the sentiment you expressed more forcefully than I did. I thank you for putting it out there. Good to hear from you again. The more reasonable thinkers here the more the ridiculous mocks itself. So I am glad to see you helping stacking the odds against them.

      John

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  2. First, could we dispense with the "young lady" designation, please? Would you refer to a 23-year old man as a "young gentleman"? This is the 21st Century and we are not discussing the British aristocracy.

    Second, another way to hide a body in winter in northern New England is to seal it in large plastic bags and bury it under a few hundred or a few thousand bales of hay, preferably in a barn a little way off the beaten path, one you may not get to, to feed your critters, until the very end of the season, if at all. It would involve some work, shifting bales, but the need to hide a murder would provide the necessary incentive, I should think. Bales are heavy devils (I should know; I've shifted enough of them), but it can be done, and by one person, if the need is great. Then, when spring melt is well underway, and the ground is soft, the body can be moved to a permanent location underground. Given enough land and enough bales, this would do very nicely, and one would be unobserved.

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    1. That is quite the interesting idea about the bales of hay. Is that from your technical knowledge around farm management and ecology? Are you aware of a case like that? Would like to hear/know more about this. One question, if the body decayed, could not not simply turn it into the soft soils come summer, under your scenario, and leave it where you stack your hay?

      Sorry that my diction annoys you. I don't really subscribe to your etymological analysis. Absent some misetep obviously offensive, I don't go in for idiosyncratic PC uptightness. Don't see it as important enough to monitor for but if I think of you as my fingers are moving, I will write it. Mind you, there is some unwarranted condescension on your part, based on a not widely accepted stylistic interpretation (although a perfectly arguable one), which smacks itself of insult. But how about we let go of stuff that don't matter and focus on Maura's case. Trust me, I do my best to overlook things that irk me here or there to stay on the point (although I have failed at that.) Thanks in advance for understanding.

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    2. Nope--no technical knowledge around farm management and ecology. Just seems an obvious--if grisly--solution for someone finding himself stuck with a body in frozen winter in northern NH. In New England, people usually stack hay in barns, not on the ground, so that's what I was thinking of--a barn loft. There was a somewhat similar case, years ago, in Maine as I recall. I'll see if I can find anything about it. It was a little girl, disappeared, remains not found for decades--in a loft.

      As to the other matter--English has an almost inexhaustible number of words for denigrating females, some subtle, some not-so-subtle. I don't like them. I simply urge you to use caution and thought. "Idiosyncratic PC uptightness"? You mean like not calling black males "boy"?

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    3. It seems like Dwight Schrute wrote this posting.

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    4. Final straw Spruce Goose. You have made ridiculous comments, like your first post about he west point honor where you confused it for the rules of thumb on a statue. You have been duplicitous, like when you tried to wriggle out of how stupid that comment made you look when it dawned on you that the Honor Code is more than the rules of thumb, and you tried to blame me for making you look stupid when you did it to yourself. You are pedantic and a wanna be elitist trying hard to find a way to take condescending attitude toward me by MAKING UP your own style rules and linguistic interpretations that have no basis and are designed to affect a superior attitude. And now you have you have proven yourself a troll by suggesting that I am racist or misogynist or both. One thing you do not do is say much of value about Maura's case. I try to be polite and not get caught on things, but you are clearly are hung on me personally and my response to you are time wasted. I suggest you talk to a professional about that hang up. In any case, here out, I will neither read nor respond to your comments. Further, if you continue to post personal comments and continue to derail the conversation, I will tell Renner "stop posting that guy or I am done." I don't have to do this. I am trying to help. What are you trying to do? You should really ask yourself that. In case, good luck. I am done with you. The wanna be elitist racism suggestion was the last straw.

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    5. Maybe, anon at 4:30, but if I had to choose a character to be in this world, I'd choose him over anonymous coward troll with inferiority complex.

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    6. Re my personal banning of Spruce Goose above, I wrote "misogynist" when I meant "sexist." He idiotically implied that I am sexist and and racist in his vain and desperate attempts to be condescending toward me, which have wasted too much time. That was the final straw and why I will no longer respond to his comments, which seldom add any value to the discourse about Maura.

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  3. Mr. Green,

    Discovery ID did an episode on Leah's case called "Soul Searcher." You may already be aware of this, but just in case the link to a youtube video of it is posted below.

    The episode indicated Leah had some contact with the locals in a town near where her car was found. One of the gentlemen behaved rather suspiciously and became the focus of investigators' interest. He since moved to Canada. There was speculation he, or some other unknown individual, tampered with Leah's car in order to crash it without a driver and stage the accident. Forensics of the car indicated Leah was not in the car at the time of the crash.

    Anyhow, I hope that is helpful.

    http://youtu.be/XWtOgM6vI7k

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    1. Thank you Ms. Farris.

      John works for me, by the way.

      Thanks for this link. I have not seen it and I am eager to watch.

      Hope to hear more from you.

      John

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    2. what is interesting is that Leah's car was tampered and so was, apparently, Maura's (rag in the tail pipe). While it seems unlikely one unknown person was involved in both incidents, the possible commonality shows a similar train of thought in the criminal mind.
      My theory is that Maura stopped at a gas station shortly before (has this been proven or disproven?)and her car was tampered with there. Seems Leah similarly had an encounter with locals before her accident.
      Since the events took play years apart, it is possible there is a criminal out there who lives in mountainous areas and, when given the opportunity, sets up out of state coeds to be abducted. It is a long shot but I wonder if there are any other, more obscure similar cases out there?
      commonalities:
      tampering
      met local
      mountainous area
      out of state victim
      body vanished

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  4. Making any sort of conclusions based on other cases is rather difficult. It is smart to look into to check whether there are any similarities, but when all is said and done you are talking about different victims, different abductors, different places.

    What makes Maura Murray's case more interesting than most is that it appears from most everything at the scene that she was drunk, crashed her car, and was abducted or took a ride with the wrong person.That is the prevailing theory and it is not a bad one.

    No matter how many wine theories I might have there is one common sense question that lurks higher than most: Why would anyone, if they did plan to run away, go to such lengths staging an accident to do so? It is a question I cannot answer.

    I tend to think Maura ran away for more reasons than just some spilled wine. In the Disappeared episode, there is one person who talks differently about Maura than others: Katie Jones. She talks about Maura in the present tense, and that is one of the reasons I do not believe it, because it seems like she does not believe it. It just made me think that Katie Jones knew Maura rather well and if she does not believe it, there is probably a reason why.

    I can only guess based on some wine what happened to Maura Murray, why there are not two spots poured into the snow at night. The wine theory is just a theory without proof.

    -Franzia wine guy

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    1. I don't think there is one grain of evidence that this accident was "staged"....what would be the purpose of such elaborate plot?

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    2. I agree with your analysis. These are offered in this light: a pattern or fact arising from these cases, related to their similarities, could alert you to a rock that needs turning in Maura's case. Looking at similar cases is a traditional practice of investigators which has been take to a new level in the last 35 or so years by the FBI and other investigative organizations in profiling.

      Appreciate, as always, your insights.

      John

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    3. South Carolina and John Green:

      South Carolina: I actually agree with you. I come back to the common sense question I wrote above, and it does not make any sense that Maura would stage anything. The answers to most mysteries and crimes are usually rather simple. But I stand by my opinion that a grown woman of Maura's size and weight did not finish even 1/4 of that box of Franzia wine. I do not know what happened to the wine, but she did not drink it. The accident scene tends to support this. Look at where the ribbon is on the tree in relation to the curve. When people are drunk, they have major problems with depth perception. The previous crash Maura was involved in with her father's car would be like a drunk driver crash. I am actually surprised she did not slam head first into the curve since two days earlier she slammed headfirst into a guardrail. And there is the added possibility that many sober people have crashed on a winter night at the same curve.

      Mr. Green: When it comes to guessing your major in college that was rather easy and part of the reason it was easy was because of your profile. There was no sarcasm intended. I believe your profile. I really do not care whether the blog is written by an attorney or a cashier. I had the unfair advantage of knowing you are an attorney and that made guessing your major easier. Look at the words you use when you write: quantitative research, quantify, analysis. All those terms are scientific or math related terms. BUTTT most people who attend law school are not math, science, or engineering majors. I only wrote most, meaning not more than I need to make this educated guess about your major. So we can then narrow it down to the humanities, political science, history, and philosophy. You wrote existential in a post so that made me think you might be a philosopher which is why I also guessed philosophy to cover my bases.

      So I chose the most logical, math oriented of the humanties majors that I could think of. Your writing says about you that you want a definite answer. If statistially that is the most likely answer, then that is the answer. You want proof. You appreciate the insight, but you want facts to back up an opinion. There is nothing wrong with that. The problem with most mysteries is that they are often rather hard to explain and even harder to prove.

      As for Maura's case, I can talk all day about the wine box for the reason that it is a box versus a bottle. You need something to drink from a box. I can talk about how I thought it was strange she called the woman in Bartlett at 12:55 and the call lasted 3 minutes yet the time stamp on the email she sent to her boyfriend was 1:00 pm. I found it strange she wrote she did not feel like talking to anyone after she just got off the phone.

      There are a lot of little things, but nothing really to suggest the case is anything other than what it appears to be.

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    4. Anonymous @ 11:59:

      What is it that the case appears to be?

      She could have been writing the email to Billy, stopped to call Bartlett then finished and sent the email.

      As for saying she did not feel like talking after she got off the phone, I don't see anything strange about that.

      Kudos on guessing one of my college majors.

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    5. Mr. Green:

      I thought the same thing. After all it is a rather short email so maybe she was in the middle of writing it when she called the woman in Bartlett like you wrote or maybe she wrote it in two minutes since it is very short.

      It is not really the time, but what the email says that is interesting. I cannot remember word for word but I think she wrote, "I love you more stud." That type of wording looks like a response to me, like she read or got a voicemail from her boyfriend and responded to him. Most people, again for the purposes of my guessing, tend to respond at the moment. Or they forget to respond.

      The case appears like a kidnapped victim or walked off to freeze to death. Being that drunk(if you actually believe she drank all that wine) would play tricks with her central nervous system. When you are drunk you do not feel cold or hot as much. So maybe she walked into the woods and froze to death.


      My questions are just questions. There is no proof of anything. I bring them up only to add to the discussion about Maura's case. Why would anyone want to stage their own disappearance anyhow? All these little things would make me think if I were an investigator and I would want to look a little closer at Maura's case.

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    6. Anonymous at 10:41

      Thanks for the comment. I agree that the content of the email is interesting. It does suggest an email response to possibly a voice mail and in that respect would constitute kind of brushing him off. It also struck me that the use of the word "stud" conceivably could have been a swipe, if you literally construe it. Of course, it could have been affectionate. The reason I bring up the sarcastic possibility is that perhaps what devastated her on Thursday was news of Billy cheating on her. Of course, some evidence would indicate that she must have already known that, but you know what they say: the romantic partner betrayed is always the last to know.

      John

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  5. You state in reference to Brooke and Maura that 'they were both abducted in 2004.' Is that your conclusion? That Maura was indeed abducted? I don't concur with that statement.

    And if it were true, then why discuss her past (I.e. why she left WP)?

    Thanks for clarifying, John.

    Ellie L.

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    1. My mistake Ellie.

      Thank you for catching that. That is NOT my conclusion. That was LAZY wording.

      Thanks again.

      John

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  6. Re: Panicked state of mind after an accident - You may want to look at the Kristi Krebs case. She had some existing problems with mental illness, drove into the woods, got stuck and her car caught on fire. She had a psychotic break because of the incident...wandering away disoriented and rescued by passersby. In a bizarre coincidence, she got her car stuck in a similar situation a few years later, and was never found. There's a witness who claims he picked her up as a hitchhiker.

    http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/k/krebs_kristi.html

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    1. Appreciate this. I was not familiar with this case.

      Best,

      John

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    2. here is a link where a shrink comments on the phenomenon of college students disappearing after accidents. he calls it Subliminal Distraction and considers it a form of amnesia:


      http://www.sitcomsonline.com/boards/showthread.php?t=235633

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  7. I'm not convinced that Maura was abducted and I find that statement to be strange. As stated before, the case that is almost identical to Maura's is the Michelle McMullen disappearence.

    Disappeared episode - The Long Drive Home (Michelle McMullen)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyRDj_tO9lE

    1. Both girls were students.
    2. Both girls were stealing money and were in big trouble with law enforcement.
    3. Both girls tied up loose ends before they disappeared. Michelle made child care arrangements. Maura packed up her stuff in boxes and told her professors that she was taking an extended absence.

    4. Both girls went on long drives that their friends and family knew nothing about right before their disappearance.

    5. Both girls abandoned their cars by the sides of the roads in lightly populated areas.
    6. Both girls' scent was tracked by bloodhounds a short distance away from their vehicles and then the dogs lost the scent.

    7. Both girls had a close girlfriend that had to have more information, but who were reluctant to tell the whole story.

    7. Both girls left letters or printed emails that seemed to offer an explanation for their disappearance.

    8. Both girls had families that insisted their daughters wouldn't run away by choice.

    Michelle McMullen was found alive and well in California.

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    1. This is a good analysis. Thanks for sharing it. You might have been referring to my erroneous suggestion that I have concluded that Maura was abducted. I don't know what happened. That was just poor wording.

      John

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  8. There are also 2 cases rather similar to Maura's that would support the whole "ran away of own free will" theory - that of Michelle McMullen, and Michele Whitaker (although I personally think Maura took a ride from the wrong person)

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    1. Was not aware of McMullen, but was aware of Whitaker. Thanks.

      John

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    2. Really? I've written about Michelle McMullen at least twice on this blog.

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    3. There is a Disappeared show about McMullen.

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  9. Um, am I the only one that was creeped out by SpruceGoose's comments about hiding a body under bales of hay? It reminded me of that mobster in the movie Snatch talking about the pigs.

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    1. Well, as funny as that is, lets try to keep it cordial here. SG misses makes contributions and for all we know he simply had an understanding of farm ops sufficient to speculate. I think he was just trying to agree that frozen rivers and hard to dig ground do not mean that you could not conceal a body in the winter. Given that SG can make it personal sometimes, I am tempted to go with the many funny comments yours inspires, but again, lets just focus on talking Maura.

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  10. No. You are not the only one who wondered about that interesting description of hiding a body under a bale of hay...

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  11. Is any one here familiar with David Paulides's books regarding missing persons in clustered areas in North-eastern and Western United States? There seems to be a pattern, at least in the way the author presents the gathered information to support his thesis. Unfortunately he does not write about NH. The closest he gets is Vermont, New England and Canada. But the strange clusters are there. So I guess one could draw some conclusions regarding the data and some of this information would yield some interesting basis for analysis.

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    1. SoCa,

      Great, Great point regarding David Paulides. His interviews on C2Cam are riveting. His books are worth the read. Seems like they would be right up John Green's alley.

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    2. What is the name of that book South Carolina? Do you happen to know what methods he uses to establish a pattern? I have heard that argument made about the northwest, but seen others argue that there really is not a pattern when you consider actual cases as opposed to reporting trends and emphasis as well as population. Curious to find out how this author approached the issue.

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    3. John,

      This is not SoCa, but the other poster above..
      The books are Missing 411: Eastern United States, and Missing 411: Western United States and Canada.
      From what I know he is retired law enforcement, search and rescue expert and journalist. Listening to his appearances on Coast to Coast am can be done on YouTube still and worth a listen as an entry to the books. I think you will find it beneficial and thought provoking for this case.

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    4. Dear other poster above.

      Thanks for the tips. I will definitely track his works down.

      And South Carolina ... thanks again as always for your contributions.

      By the way, "other poster above" is a dry name for someone sincerely engaged here, so if you can go by name, even a fake one, it would be nice to remember you specifically when you make a comment.

      John

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    5. David Paulides seems interested in BigFoot so I would presume he considers (without having read his books which seem to be mostly out of print) the disappearances to either be proof of why no evidence of BigFoot has ever been found or that the disappearances are in fact caused by BigFoot. After watching Finding Bigfoot and its nonsense I tend to believe less in BigFoot even though an online database lists a sighting less than a mile from my home years ago in a wooded area along the banks of the Missouri River. I look everytime I drive by but have seen nothing except Canadian geese.

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  12. I found an interesting missing persons case though have no idea how it could be related to Maura Murray but here goes...Maura went missing on February 9, 2004 on Route 112 in Haverhill, New Hampshire. On August 4, 2002, Dennis Robert Towle (white male/age 59) went missing in Woodsville, New Hampshire. The link below gives more information and says "Dennis was last seen walking his dog at approximately 12:00pm in the vicinity of Chapel St. in Woodsville, NH. His dog was later found at his residence. Dennis left all personal belongings behind including his medication. Extensive searches have been conducted in frequented areas including White River, VT and wooded areas." Google Maps shows Chapel Street in Woodsville and Route 112 in Haverhill is only 6.9 miles (11 minutes to drive). Both cases are being handled by the Haverhill Police Department (I'm not saying the Police has anything to do with this, but that both cases happened very close together since the same Police Department is handling both cases). https://www.findthemissing.org/cases/case_report_html/213

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    1. Thank you for this Debbie. Much appreciated.

      John

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  13. I maintain Maura crossed paths with the wrong person that fateful February night.

    Did Maura have problems? Hell yes. She had problems coming out of her ears. Did Maura have "secrets". Hell yes. She had secrets coming out of her ears.

    So do many, many young women.

    Maura was a sitting duck to a perp. It was a crime of opportunity in my opinion.

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    1. Thanks for this comment. It is certainly a possibility. I still feel that if we knew more about why she went up there we'd have a better chance to limit the scope among the broad options of exposure related death, fleeing her life, foul play, etc.

      John

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  14. Hi John,

    This is a bit off topic but one thing that just occured to me was the book that was found in Maura's car, Not Without Peril. I believe it is about unfortunate hiking incidents? Did you ever get a chance to read this book? It may just be coincidence but what if there are clues in the book that point to what Maura was planning. That is if her disappearance was planned.

    Thank you for your insight as always,
    Amanda

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    1. Hi Amanda.

      I actually read this book in the several days after I discovered Maura' case, during a 4,000 mile road trip and hiking trip through upstate New York and New England. The book is quite a good read. It focuses on dangerous spots and meteorological perils of mainly the Presidential range. There is an understated theme of how skiers and hikers have not taken seriously enough the dangers related to the sudden and unpredictable changes in weather (Mount Washington famously has its own weather systems) or the lack of signage on the mountains.

      The accounts of people who died of exposure might be informative in Maura's case. To wit, if you go deep enough into hypothermia, you lose the sensation of being cold. People who have died of exposure in brutal environments have been found as if in a relaxed posture enjoying themselves. The brain at some just quits on delivering the news of terrible cold and fatal dangers. It is written in vignettes. In general, it added to my understanding of a topic I have read a great deal about (and learned about in very difficult first hand situations): the danger or merely being alone in nature. Small, seemingly innocuous events or missteps can suddenly leave you in a profoundly bad situation. Knowledge and foresight, as well as caution and planning is required when you are alone in deep wilderness. It is surprisingly risky. All the more so on mountains with their own fickle and fierce weather systems. Maura was southwest of the Presidential range, but only about five miles from entering the same national forest. I would say the book is generally informative about the possibility of dying of exposure, but other sources hit more directly on the issues, showing how and when and why the body can begin to succumb to hypothermia. For one thing, it happens more quickly is you are dehydrated, if you have alcohol in your system. It happens more quickly if you are tired and probably also if you are under stress or panicking. Sources about backwoods safety tell you that above all you cannot panick when you are lost because so doing consumes energy that your system needs to keep you warm.

      Perhaps the most compelling thing about the book is that if was found in her car. While - as Fred and Kathleen have said - it may have been her favorite book, it is a somewhat odd thing to bring a long for a night time ride down a dark New Hampshire road by yourself, particularly when you have been under great stress. If a staging scenario were to be shown by other evidence, I would look back at the book at think that it was the perfect thing to throw into the car.

      John

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  15. I dont see how there are similar elements in Mauras and Brookes case except that both happened the same year. I mean, we dont know for sure that Maura was abducted, but we know that Brooke was. Plus Brookes case happened at the other side of the state and it was solved. How is there any similiarity to Mauras case? We dont know what happened to her, we dont know where she is and whether she is alive or dead etc.
    Yeah, I agree that there are similarities between Mauras and Leahs case but I dont think that there is any connection between those cases, as both happened in far aways states. Plus Mauras accident was (as far as we know) a real accident, Leahs accident seemed to be staged. I think Leah met with foul play. Maura probably did as well, but I think in Mauras case we have many many possible happenings that are same likely, so therefore its a really mysterious case.

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    1. Claudia,

      The point of the post is that each case bears a similarity to Maura's in a way that might be illuminating now or at some point if new evidence arises and we can - as investigators and profilers do - look toward similar cases for help in exploring options in Maura's case. As you said, Leah's case involves a car ride and accident followed by a disappearance. Brooke's case involves a body hidden effectively in the back woods (without being buried underground) which investigators say may never have been found but for the perpetrator's confession to avoid the death penalty. This bears on Maura's case because foul play and a body hidden somewhere in the woods is one of several broad possibilities regarding her fate.

      John

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    2. Still though Claudia, I hear your point. We have to be careful. Not being a profiler means that there is a danger of "stereotyping" Maura's case based on comparison to another. This was in the context of my thinking when I wrote the comment above and I should have put it out first. I hope the above comment did not seem dismissive. If it did, I apologize. Keep posting your insights!

      John

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  16. I think the disappeareance of Brianna Maitland shows also similarities to Mauras case. Same year, close area, car included.

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    1. And close by. I know the connection between Brianna's and Maura's cases have been dismissed for various reasons, and I know there are fewer puzzling elements around Brianna's (i.e., why she was where she was and where she was going.) But nonetheless, the similarities are there and - as profilers show - the more you understand about the resolution of other cases - the more finely tuned are your instincts toward a given case.

      John

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